Custom Modular Homes USA 

What Is a CMHUSA modular Home? Think safety.

Odds are that you live in an ordinary wood frame home. It may be a tract home in a tract home subdivision, or it may be a home on a larger lot somewhere. Either way, the odds are that your wood frame house was built the "the ordinary way."  That is, it was built board by board outdoors on the open ground—rain or shine—by workers showing up in cars and trucks, preceded by lumber trucks dropping of all sorts of wood material that should never get wet. Sorry to tell you this.

But there is a better way. Rather than build the ordinary way, have CMHUSA build 80-to 85 percent of the house in one of its factories.  Although CMHUSA will in some cases build a house the ordinary way, CMHUSA strongly advocates for the benefits of properly built modular with far more wood in the wood frame and with CMHUSA oversight. The result will be less maintenance with the better-built home, greater energy efficiency and the prospect of greater safety.

 alike2    alike2
  Is this house built with modules?

A modular home is built in the form of hidden modules. Each module is built indoors, in a controlled environment. To build a stronger and more durable home, CMHUSA strongly advocates for the use of modules.  80- to 85 percent of the specialized labor is done by the same skilled workers every day. Structural detail and durability are important beneficiaries. Quality checks are continuous. 

 
Is this house built the ordinary way?

A house built the ordinary way is built outdoors in the open air—rain or shine. No modules. CMHUSA will build this way, but only as a last resort. Odds are, the house you live in is in a housing tract. Odds are that all building materials and lumber arrived by truck and were left at the lot. Workers, sometimes not seen by the builders before, arrive and begin sawing and nailing. The result is your house.

See "Professional Builder Magazine":  What this article is saying is that "the single-family modular home built today" has evolved, just as telephones have evolved to the smart phones today.  But here's the thing:  Although the elegance of modular and site built may be identical, don't be be fooled:  The weight and durability of the true CMHUSA modular are like a heavyweight boxer facing off against a lightweight. Knockout!  One punch!  Fight over!  To see why, check the specifications of the heavyweight home vs. the lightweight home. This article confuses the terms site built and stick built: https://www.probuilder.com/modern-modular-builders-redefine-what-modular-home-means

Here's what "Realtor Magazine," in article "Making the Move to Modular," says:  "Today's modular homes are also energy efficient, hurricane and earthquake resistant, sustainable, customized and competitively priced with other comparable designs."  See http://realtormag.realtor.org/home-and-design/architecture-coach/article/2013/08/making-move-modular

Here's what "EcoBuilding Pulse" a publication of the American Institute of Architects, says: ". . . green building depends on critical construction details, such as accurate sealing, flashing and insulation. Working in a climate-controlled environment that resembles a cabinet shop more than a construction site, technicians and craftsmen labor comfortably on all levels of a structure . . ."  See http://www.ecobuildingpulse.com/projects/product-review-modular-homes_o

 

stick

 

It's no one's fault. Either of the following tests would likely destroy your current home:

After all, homes built the ordinary way (outdoors on open land) do not need the durability to be raced down a highway.  Extreme forces such as in Test One and Test Two would destroy it. To get the strength of true modular, buy modular. Contact CMHUSA.

• Test One transports finished modules down highways at 55 miles per hour, hour after hour, on good roads and bad. Yes, you can safely bet that such killer forces would tear apart your tract-built home, leaving pieces of sheetrock, glass and insulation scattered along the road for 50 miles. 

• Test Two is to lift the modules high into the air using a massive crane. Already weakened by Test One, what is left of a house built the ordinary way would likely break apart—remember the scene in the movie "Titanic." 

 
model-being-set-t

 

"Freakishly strong!" say onlookers.

Even with the strain of having up to 15- to 20- or even 25- to 30 percent more wood than a house built the ordinary way, the massive CMHUSA modules do not slump or collapse during the lifting. 

Next comes very large bolts: Once in place, the modules will be bolted to one another, cranking up the strength of structure even more.   

By the end of the first day, true CMHUSA heavyweight modules will already look as if the house had been built the ordinary way. This photo was taken in the morning. The next photo, an hour or so later, shows the yellow crane behind the house. It is about to lift a very strong dormer and place it on the black roof at the far right.         

     
model074t

 

Safety.

Is a CMHUSA module-based home safer against natural disasters?

The good news is that a heavyweight module acceptable to CMHUSA (or even a poorly built module not acceptable to CMHUSA) will publicly demonstrate that it can survive manmade Test One and Test Two.

But the world is not a perfect place. A logically safer choice is no guarantee of survival when it comes to the randomness of Mother Nature's violence. Only you can decide which construction approach you feel is the smartest choice for your family.

     

CONTACT CMHUSA ABOUT HIGH PERFORMANCE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION.

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save